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2000 J70PLSSD no spark #3 cylinder

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  • 2000 J70PLSSD no spark #3 cylinder

    I bought a 70 hp for my 1650 fishhawk. the Engine did not run or idle well and eventually would not run at all. No spark. I diagnosed a bad timer base and replaced it. Now I have spark on #1 and #2 but 3 is dead. I switched the #1 and #3 coils and plug wires but #3 is still dead telling me it is not the coil.

    At this point I think I have a bad power pack or possibly a bad stator. I think the power pack controls the firing on the three cylinders and is my most likely the culprit.

    The power pack OHMed out properly. The stator ohmed out at 735 on the Brown to Brown/Yellow and 410 OHMs from the Orange to Orange/Black. The trouble shooting guide from CDI says the stators OHM should be between 450 and 550 OHMS. I cannot measure DVA.

    My question is can a bad stator cause just one cylinder to not fire while the others work or does this mode of failure point to the power pack.

  • #2
    A failing stator would not cause a singular problem such as you mention.

    That would pertain to a timing sensor, a power pack..... BUT more & most likely the following failure.

    ********************
    (Electrical Pins/Sockets - Poor Connection)
    (J. Reeves)

    The electrical rubber connectors that house a series of Pins and Sockets within them have a flaw which can easily be overlooked. The the pin or socket (or both) has been known to be pushed back slightly when pulling them apart and pushing them back together when replacing a component or doing test work.

    Also, the wire that is attached to these pins and sockets has been known to break away from the pins/sockets which results in either a very poor or no connection at all. I've found many instances where the wire is held tight in the rubber connector by pure friction but in reality is not making any connection.

    Be sure to check all of those rubber plugs for the proper pin/socket position and wiring attachments.

    ********************

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    • #3
      Thanks for your response Joe. I did check the connectors per your suggestion and found the black and white wire going to the thermostat was pushed back. A good thing to find now but I don't think that would cause one cylinder to cut out? The others seemed tp be positioned properly and my OHM readings were good on all the tests I ran so I think wire to pin connections are all good. I am going to buy a DVA adaptor so I can measure DVA and see if that shows anything I am missing with the OHM testing. I am assuming the rectifier would not be a suspect in this single cylinder miss scenario would it? Thanks in advance for your response.

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      • #4
        In reading over your latest entry, the problem would need to be either a faulty timing sensor or powerpack to affect just #3 coil (a proven good coil).

        Timing senors should all read the same to be eliminated... the power pack? <-- Frankly, it has always been easier for me just to replace it rather than to go thru the trouble to test it (parts on hand as test equipment)... but for the individual, I know, it's a expensive gamble.

        However, it all goes back to the saying of (sort of)..... "If all other systems check out, the one system remaining"........ I'm sure you know the original saying.

        Also, if it came to that some other weird flunky thing was to blame... having a spare pack and the tools to change it would be worthwhile to have in your on-board toolbox as those things usually fail at the damnest times.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Joe Reeves View Post
          In reading over your latest entry, the problem would need to be either a faulty timing sensor or powerpack to affect just #3 coil (a proven good coil).

          Timing senors should all read the same to be eliminated... the power pack? <-- Frankly, it has always been easier for me just to replace it rather than to go thru the trouble to test it (parts on hand as test equipment)... but for the individual, I know, it's a expensive gamble.

          However, it all goes back to the saying of (sort of)..... "If all other systems check out, the one system remaining"........ I'm sure you know the original saying.

          Also, if it came to that some other weird flunky thing was to blame... having a spare pack and the tools to change it would be worthwhile to have in your on-board toolbox as those things usually fail at the damnest times.
          I was going to just order the power pack but suffer from cheapprickitus. So I bought the DVA to check the outputs. thanks for your help and I will post again with the "final solution"

          Comment


          • #6
            I wish I could point my finger at the guilty culprit but you're very clear in what you've been doing and have really covered all the bases in such a manner that I don't have any doubts about your trouble-shooting. Everything you've done has eliminated everything except the electronics within the powerpack. Frankly, I never had a problem with the points system and have often wondered why OMC changed over to solid state. What was worse... changing the points/condensers occasionally ($) or the pack and/or related parts ($$$)?

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            • #7
              No idea where I am going on this site. No help in how to post an inquiry. I need info on replacing starter pinion on 1966 6 hp Johnson. No idea where to go to find it as navigation here seems impossible.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OLDGOSPELMAN View Post
                No idea where I am going on this site. No help in how to post an inquiry. I need info on replacing starter pinion on 1966 6 hp Johnson. No idea where to go to find it as navigation here seems impossible.
                NO, not impossible. Go back a page, look on the left hand side about 6" from the top of thew page... a black block with white print is there that states "New Topic". Simply click on that and you're on your way.

                To answer your question, the gearcase needs to be drained, then the skeg removed to get at the pinion gear. How do you know the pinion gear needs replacing.

                DO NOT reply here... Start your own topic under your own name so-as to keep things straight & proper. (Joe)

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